State of International Cooperation on Cybercrime

Wednesday, June 23, 2010

Simon Heron

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Last week’s Talinn conference was the latest in a series of international gatherings to discuss cybercrime.

Unfortunately, although international cooperation is an essential element in defeating cybercrime, these discussions have so far been unable to find an actionable agreement.

Yes, treaties have been signed and in some cases, ratified, but what use are these documents if they don’t produce results?

In our new paper, The state of international co-operation on cybercrime, we explore what has been done to create an international response to cybercrime and look at what is still left to be done.

Clearly, it will take quite a while for nations to agree and implement an international strategy to fight cybercrime.

It could even end up being a private sector initiative – consumers need protecting and businesses don’t have the same diplomatic worries that Governments do.

But it’s imperative that Governments keep working together to find a solution in the interim and with the UK now being responsible for almost six per cent of the world’s viruses and receiving more than its fair share of malware, it’s obvious that finding an international solution to the problem should be one of the new British Government’s number one priorities.

Meanwhile, the IT industry will keep developing defences to the increasingly varied attack vectors and  trainers will endeavour to spread the word on security to users. 

However, in parallel governments need to continue to try and find some form of agreement that will enable them to fight this menace together.

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